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Andrew Teman

This sign is on the front door of Master Printing and Signs in Somerville. A shop, that as far as I can tell, handles the commercial printing needs of small business. Signs, brochures, banners, that sort of thing. 
 And this is one of the most prominent signs on the storefront. It’s literally affixed to the entrance at eye level. 
 What strikes me as odd about all of this, is how the sign likely came to be. At some point (presumably) so many people came into the shop trying to buy copy services, that the shop owners decided that something needed to be done. And what was ultimately decided on, was a sign telling people (firmly) that they DO NOT make copies. 
 When we work on experiential, digital and social programs at Hill Holliday, one of the first things we look for, is what people are already doing naturally. What existing behaviors and gravitational pulls exist, that we can build on top of to make successful programs. 
 It’s always tempting to have your own idea of what people SHOULD do, and then become overly precious to that idea, often to the point of self destruction. 
 But however strong those temptations may be, my experiences tell me that it generally pays to draft off of what people are telling you they want, versus what you insist that they have.

This sign is on the front door of Master Printing and Signs in Somerville. A shop, that as far as I can tell, handles the commercial printing needs of small business. Signs, brochures, banners, that sort of thing.

And this is one of the most prominent signs on the storefront. It’s literally affixed to the entrance at eye level.

What strikes me as odd about all of this, is how the sign likely came to be. At some point (presumably) so many people came into the shop trying to buy copy services, that the shop owners decided that something needed to be done. And what was ultimately decided on, was a sign telling people (firmly) that they DO NOT make copies.

When we work on experiential, digital and social programs at Hill Holliday, one of the first things we look for, is what people are already doing naturally. What existing behaviors and gravitational pulls exist, that we can build on top of to make successful programs.

It’s always tempting to have your own idea of what people SHOULD do, and then become overly precious to that idea, often to the point of self destruction.

But however strong those temptations may be, my experiences tell me that it generally pays to draft off of what people are telling you they want, versus what you insist that they have.

Andrew Temanthinking