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Andrew Teman

Posts tagged twitter
Brands on Twitter are your uncle posting out-of-focus selfies on Instagram with 13 hashtags, including #Sunday and #shorts. Brands on Twitter are your high-school science teacher comparing electrons to Zack Morris to try to get you to stay awake in fifth period. Brands on Twitter are your weird cousin talking during the movie when you’re just trying to watch, okay? Jesus, Freddie, do you always need to be the center of attention?
Why Brands Tweet ‘Bae’
Rob Delaney on Walmart & Twitter

Rob Delaney’s thoughts on the Walmart Twitter account. I agree with this so hard on every level.

If you look at the Walmart Twitter, it is the worst, most pathetically offensive thing on the Internet. They totally have people who have like ***social media degrees*** running it. They clearly have a protocol where you literally respond to every tweet that they get–except ones from me, they never respond to me.

They try to feign humanity and engage with users. First of all, if you’re tweeting Walmart, you’re an idiot. Really? It’s like, “Hey, I couldn’t find Jack Reacher on Blu-Ray!” So they’ll write back, “It’s in the DVD section! Hey, what are you doing for Memorial Day?!” It’s like they ask a question that the answer will absolutely not matter and they’ll never see it but they try to engage like they’re your friend ***Corey***! To me that’s on the level of, if the Nazis had invented SkyNet, that’s what it would be like. To pretend that you’re a human being when you’re a gigantic soulless multinational. I can’t off the top of my head think of anything more disgusting and offensive.

So I would love to literally tweet for them and tell the truth, and be like, “We’re Walmart. We’re giant. We have many things for you to live a very bland and copiously overstuffed life of milquetoast unoriginality. You know what you’re gonna get, so just swing on by. Don’t ask us any questions because we’re a friggin’ robot running a Twitter account.“ I’d make it much more popular.

I’ve noticed two things recently about Twitter spam. First, I’ve seen a huge uptick in spam accounts “Favoriting” my tweets as a means to get my attention. Not sure if the idea here is that it’s less expected to be spammy (versus a random @ reply with a link), but it’s becoming more common. 
 Second, lots of Twitter spam accounts are starting to look like the above, and they’re hilarious. Clearly these are bots and/or non-native English speakers, and the mishmash of phrasing and wording in the bios, is great. 
 They’re obviously designed to mimic the most common territory for legit Twitter users (gaming, bacon, social media, music, entrepreneurship, etc), but the language is  just  off enough, where it has some comedic value.

I’ve noticed two things recently about Twitter spam. First, I’ve seen a huge uptick in spam accounts “Favoriting” my tweets as a means to get my attention. Not sure if the idea here is that it’s less expected to be spammy (versus a random @ reply with a link), but it’s becoming more common.

Second, lots of Twitter spam accounts are starting to look like the above, and they’re hilarious. Clearly these are bots and/or non-native English speakers, and the mishmash of phrasing and wording in the bios, is great.

They’re obviously designed to mimic the most common territory for legit Twitter users (gaming, bacon, social media, music, entrepreneurship, etc), but the language is just off enough, where it has some comedic value.

This is why I love the Internet. @ enjoythefilm  exists purely to tweet spoilers at unsuspecting tv/movie lovers. Absolutely beautiful. 
 It’s just so perfect behaviorally. Users tweet about their excitement for an upcoming movie, and when they see an @ reply, the simple instinct is to automatically read it. And by the time you’ve read it…spoiler. Too late. 
 Genius. 

This is why I love the Internet. @enjoythefilm exists purely to tweet spoilers at unsuspecting tv/movie lovers. Absolutely beautiful.

It’s just so perfect behaviorally. Users tweet about their excitement for an upcoming movie, and when they see an @ reply, the simple instinct is to automatically read it. And by the time you’ve read it…spoiler. Too late.

Genius. 

Subtweets & Twitter Jail

As part of some recent focus groups with social media using teens, I learned about two new things.

Subtweeting

It’s the shortening of “subliminal tweet” which is directly referring to a particular person without mentioning their name or directly mentioning them and it basically indicates that the tweet in which the hashtag is used is a subliminal tweet.


And Twitter Jail

Twitter Jail is no tweeting if you’ve reached the limit of 100 tweets per hour/1000 per day.

You can access your page, you may not post publicly for a specific period of time. Anything from half an hour to a few hours.

Consider me enlightened.


If you provide excellent content, social media users will take the time to read and talk about it in their networks. That’s what you really want. You don’t want a cheap thumbs up, you want your readers to talk about your content with their own voice.
Sweep The Sleaze
Brands need to be careful in not only what, but how much they curate. There can’t be articles that make the reader question why a brand is sharing it. Also, brands need to make sure they’re not just regurgitating content, but instead offering readers/followers valuable information, as readers will quickly determine the curated content — and thus the brand — is not worth their time
Brands Want To Be Content Creators
Gaming Social Media Contests

For years now there have been groups of people, who more or less have become professional online-sweepstakes-enterers.

And now, it seems that this gaming of the system is spreading over to the social media contest space as well.

I was poking around Toyota’s Shareathon contest, and it struck me that most of the activity Toyota is trying to drive, appears to be junk.

The contest essentially tracks a user’s ability to generate retweets of a stock message, and then eslcalates rewards based on volume of re-tweets.

If you get a new Toyota during Toyotathon, you can receive a prepaid debit card just by tweeting our Shareathon message. It starts at $500 and goes up $50 with each retweet, up to $1000. Those who retweet can also enter for a chance to win a Prius.

But when you click into the re-tweeters from the leader-board, the activity seems to be coming from lots of dummy accounts, created solely for purpose of recording a re-tweet for the contest.

For instance:

http://twitter.com/#!/cylis9

http://twitter.com/#!/dashameful1

http://twitter.com/#!/elisaangel

http://twitter.com/#!/Amy1566

Now obviously this contest is really predicated on users BUYING a car in order to claim some of these prizes, so the looseness of this behavior should be put into the proper context. But once again, it isn’t just about generating noise and volume. It’s about generating actual quality and something of value in the space, to the brand, and to the users.